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FULL EPISODE: June 30, 2022

June 30, 2022

Celebrate the 130th anniversary of basketball by digging into the archives at Springfield College, where the sport was invented and first played.Then, UMass Fine Arts Center Director Jamila Deria shares how the local arts scene continues to thrive in the face of the pandemic and talks about upcoming shows at the FAC.And, we'll visit Shire Breu-Hous, a craft brewery and one of many small businesses bringing new life to the historic Stationery Fact

Celebrate the 130th anniversary of basketball by digging into the archives at Springfield College, where the sport was invented and first played.Then, UMass Fine Arts Center Director Jamila Deria shares how the local arts scene co

Celebrate the 130th anniversary of basketball by digging into the archives at Springfield College, where the sport was invented and first played.Then, UMass Fine Arts Center Director Jamila Deria shares how the local arts scene continues to thrive in the face of the pandemic and talks about upcoming shows at the FAC.And, we'll visit Shire Breu-Hous, a craft brewery and one of many small businesses bringing new life to the historic Stationery Fact

Celebrate the 130th anniversary of basketball by digging into the archives at Springfield College, where the sport was invented and first played.

Then, UMass Fine Arts Center Director Jamila Deria shares how the local arts scene continues to thrive in the face of the pandemic and talks about upcoming shows at the FAC.

And, we'll visit Shire Breu-Hous, a craft brewery and one of many small businesses bringing new life to the historic Stationery Factory in Dalton.

Finally, meet Avery Maltz, an LGBTQ+ student at HCC whose inspiring story and passion for learning earned them a Point Foundation scholarship.

Celebrate the 130th anniversary of basketball by digging into the archives at Springfield College, where the sport was invented and first played.Then, UMass Fine Arts Center Director Jamila Deria shares how the local arts scene continues to thrive in the face of the pandemic and talks about upcoming shows at the FAC.And, we'll visit Shire Breu-Hous, a craft brewery and one of many small businesses bringing new life to the historic Stationery Fact

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UMass Fine Arts Center 2022 Season Preview (Digital Exclusive)

June 30, 2022

UMass Fine Arts Center Director Jamilla Deria gives host Zydalis Bauer a sneak peek at some of the shows you’ll find at the FAC this spring. Watch our full interview with Jamilla Deria.This segment was originally part of our January 20, 2022 show.Read the full transcription:Zydalis Bauer, Connecting Point: At the start of the new year and the shift now into the 2022 portion of the season, what does the rest of the programing look like?Jamilla Der

UMass Fine Arts Center Director Jamilla Deria gives host Zydalis Bauer a sneak peek at some of the shows you’ll find at the FAC this spring. Watch our full interview with Jamilla Deria.This segment was originally part of our Janua

UMass Fine Arts Center Director Jamilla Deria gives host Zydalis Bauer a sneak peek at some of the shows you’ll find at the FAC this spring. Watch our full interview with Jamilla Deria.This segment was originally part of our January 20, 2022 show.Read the full transcription:Zydalis Bauer, Connecting Point: At the start of the new year and the shift now into the 2022 portion of the season, what does the rest of the programing look like?Jamilla Der

UMass Fine Arts Center Director Jamilla Deria gives host Zydalis Bauer a sneak peek at some of the shows you’ll find at the FAC this spring. 

Watch our full interview with Jamilla Deria.

This segment was originally part of our January 20, 2022 show.

Read the full transcription:

Zydalis Bauer, Connecting Point: At the start of the new year and the shift now into the 2022 portion of the season, what does the rest of the programing look like?

Jamilla Deria, UMass Fine Arts Center: At the Fine Arts Center, we like to say that we bring the world through the arts to UMass and the Pioneer Valley. And I think that you'll find that we are living up to that aim in the spring season. And I'll just give you a couple of highlights.

We open up our spring season with this amazing five person acapella group called Nobuntu from Zimbabwe. They're singing Ndebele songs, which originally was an art form that was meant for men only, and they've re-imagined it with issues that are pertinent to the women of Zimbabwe. And also, they're really focused on using music to bridge gaps across social, economic, and political fault lines.

We then move over to Quebec and we're presenting Cirque Flip Fabrique - Six, Cirque is a contemporary circus ensemble. The founder really believes in the power of play, and while it's a fantastic family show, it's really meant for all audiences to come, leave your troubles at the door and enjoy the comedy, enjoy the amazing acrobatics, and all of the wonderful circus performance that they bring.

We then head up to Ireland for Danu, which is there the leading Irish ensemble group of around -- and we're going to be presenting them around St. Patrick's Day. And we're so thrilled, it's really gorgeous music. What they say is that their musical journey through the country of Ireland.

We then head over to Small Island Big Song, which is a fantastic new project. It is artists from 16 island nations joining forces, making music, using their local instruments and traditional sounds to really call to attention the issues of climate change.

As we know, that island nations are at the forefront of this pressing global issue and that if if we don't do something quickly, that the cultures of songs that that you'll hear on the stage will, you know, disappear in maybe the next, you know, next few centuries. And so, I think that not only is the mission of the show so important and so timely, but the music is so powerful and amazing. So, I invite your audiences to come out for that.

And then we round out the the season with Alvin Ailey. They come to us with their amazing repertoire, including Revelations.

It's going to be a fantastic season, and what I've talked about is only a spoonful of all of the amazing performances and exhibitions that were offering this spring.

UMass Fine Arts Center Director Jamilla Deria gives host Zydalis Bauer a sneak peek at some of the shows you’ll find at the FAC this spring. Watch our full interview with Jamilla Deria.This segment was originally part of our January 20, 2022 show.Read the full transcription:Zydalis Bauer, Connecting Point: At the start of the new year and the shift now into the 2022 portion of the season, what does the rest of the programing look like?Jamilla Der

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Avery Maltz on the HCC Greenhouse (Digital Exclusive)

June 30, 2022

Avery Maltz shares some fun facts about the Holyoke Community College greenhouse and what they enjoy the most about being its caretaker with Zydalis Bauer.  Watch our full interview with Avery Maltz.This interview was originally part of our January 20, 2022 show.Read the full transcription:Avery Maltz, Point Foundation Wells Fargo Scholarship Recipient: We have about anywhere from two hundred and fifty to three hundred plants. It can vary, you kn

Avery Maltz shares some fun facts about the Holyoke Community College greenhouse and what they enjoy the most about being its caretaker with Zydalis Bauer.  Watch our full interview with Avery Maltz.This interview was originally p

Avery Maltz shares some fun facts about the Holyoke Community College greenhouse and what they enjoy the most about being its caretaker with Zydalis Bauer.  Watch our full interview with Avery Maltz.This interview was originally part of our January 20, 2022 show.Read the full transcription:Avery Maltz, Point Foundation Wells Fargo Scholarship Recipient: We have about anywhere from two hundred and fifty to three hundred plants. It can vary, you kn

Avery Maltz shares some fun facts about the Holyoke Community College greenhouse and what they enjoy the most about being its caretaker with Zydalis Bauer.  

Watch our full interview with Avery Maltz.

This interview was originally part of our January 20, 2022 show.

Read the full transcription:

Avery Maltz, Point Foundation Wells Fargo Scholarship Recipient: We have about anywhere from two hundred and fifty to three hundred plants. It can vary, you know, depending on depending on the season. And within that, about one hundred and thirty species.

It's a very diverse little place. It's small, but we pack a lot in there. I've kind of divided things into different regions, little mini ecosystems. So they're kind of all clumped with their friends, and it's just a beautiful place.

You walk in and you just, like, immediately smell the fresh air. And yeah, it's really nice.

Zydalis Bauer: And you even have had some fruits come from these plants, correct?

Avery Maltz, Point Foundation Wells Fargo Scholarship Recipient: Yeah, we've had limes. We have a banana tree. It still hasn't flowered.

The most exciting fruits, I think, have been...the monstera produced a fruit, which I had never seen before. So I got to take that.

Zydalis Bauer: Yeah, to be honest, I didn't even know monstera produced a fruit, so that's pretty cool.

Avery Maltz, Point Foundation Wells Fargo Scholarship Recipient: They do. It has to be really mature to produce a fruit, and most of the ones that people have in their homes, like they just don't have the resources in a house to actually be able to to produce a fruit like that.

Zydalis Bauer: So as I mentioned us being home with the pandemic, can you talk to me about some of the therapeutic value that being inside the greenhouse offered you, especially during the times that we're going through?

Avery Maltz, Point Foundation Wells Fargo Scholarship Recipient: It was really, really nice to be able to go in and take care of the plants during that time. And it was very eerie because the whole school was empty and all the posters were still up from like the week before everything went remote. And, you know, I would just go in and and take care of the plants, and it felt like a really powerful way to stay connected.

During that time, I started an Instagram account for the greenhouse so that I could share with the campus community the different things that were happening in the greenhouse, things that were flowering, or little updates on the plants. And it was just a really nice way to kind of bring people in to that experience.

Zydalis Bauer: And now that we are deep in the winter months, it's cold, it's dreary outside.

Do you have any tips for us about houseplants and what should we be looking out for? What are the what are the perfect plants to have during this time of year?

Avery Maltz, Point Foundation Wells Fargo Scholarship Recipient: The perfect plants to have it depends on your house and your situation, but a few winter tips: please move your plants away from the heaters. Oftentimes, you'll have like a baseboard heater or something like right below a window, but you really want to make sure your plants are not right next to that heater because it's going to dry out the plant.

And also, I don't fertilize in the winter, even if it still looks good and feels like it's growing -- like the plants behind me look good, right? But most plants are a little bit dormant in the winter months because they're not getting that same amount of, like, light and warmth that they would need. So yeah, they don't need fertilizer in the winter.

Zydalis Bauer: Where did your passion come for caring for plants? How did you even end up in the role as caretaker of the HCC greenhouse?

Avery Maltz, Point Foundation Wells Fargo Scholarship Recipient: Honestly, I don't know where it comes from! I just love plants. But my first semester, I -- I would walk past the greenhouse on my way to class and I would look in the window and I just I just felt like I wanted to be in there, you know?

And so I reached out to one of the biology professors and I asked her if there were any opportunities to get involved. And yeah, the rest is history.

Avery Maltz shares some fun facts about the Holyoke Community College greenhouse and what they enjoy the most about being its caretaker with Zydalis Bauer.  Watch our full interview with Avery Maltz.This interview was originally part of our January 20, 2022 show.Read the full transcription:Avery Maltz, Point Foundation Wells Fargo Scholarship Recipient: We have about anywhere from two hundred and fifty to three hundred plants. It can vary, you kn

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UMass Fine Arts Center Continues Season in Face of COVID Surge

June 30, 2022

Last year, the UMass Amherst Fine Arts Center kicked off their Fall season with a variety of performances and programming including the reopening of the University’s art galleries after being closed due to the pandemic.  Zydalis Bauer speaks with Jamilla Deria, Director of the Fine Arts Center, to learn how the local arts scene is prevailing during the pandemic as well as to hear about the rest of the season’s upcoming events at the FAC. Explore

Last year, the UMass Amherst Fine Arts Center kicked off their Fall season with a variety of performances and programming including the reopening of the University’s art galleries after being closed due to the pandemic.  Zydalis B

Last year, the UMass Amherst Fine Arts Center kicked off their Fall season with a variety of performances and programming including the reopening of the University’s art galleries after being closed due to the pandemic.  Zydalis Bauer speaks with Jamilla Deria, Director of the Fine Arts Center, to learn how the local arts scene is prevailing during the pandemic as well as to hear about the rest of the season’s upcoming events at the FAC. Explore

Last year, the UMass Amherst Fine Arts Center kicked off their Fall season with a variety of performances and programming including the reopening of the University’s art galleries after being closed due to the pandemic.  

Zydalis Bauer speaks with Jamilla Deria, Director of the Fine Arts Center, to learn how the local arts scene is prevailing during the pandemic as well as to hear about the rest of the season’s upcoming events at the FAC. 

Explore some of the show coming to the FAC this spring in a digital exclusive clip.

This interview originally aired on January 20, 2022.

Read the full transcription:

Tony Dunne, Connecting Point: Last year, the UMass Amherst Fine Arts Center kicked off their fall season with a variety of performances and programing, including the reopening of the university's art galleries after being closed due to COVID-19.

Zydalis Bauer spoke with Jamilla Deria, Director of the Fine Arts Center, to find out how the local art scene is prevailing during the pandemic and learn about the rest of the season.

Jamilla Deria, UMass Fine Arts Center: We're so happy to be able to let everyone know that we're open, that we are welcoming audiences back.

And you know, the campus, as well as the Fine Arts Center, has safety at the top of our agenda and we are making -- we've just completed some extensive planning to ensure that everyone can come to our campus, be safe and enjoy events.

Zydalis Bauer, Connecting Point: So, Jamilla, you started at the UMass Fine Arts Center in 2019 and just one year after you began boom, the pandemic hits.

So how were you able to navigate that and what have been some of the challenges that have come with that?

Jamilla Deria: It was certainly a baptism by fire! I don't think anyone saw it coming, and certainly no one was really prepared for a global pandemic. Certainly, not in my very first year here at the Fine Arts Center.

But I will say that I was so fortunate -- and I am still so fortunate -- to have an amazing team who is resilient, resourceful, and just can pivot on a dime. We got the official notice that our buildings were closed on March 16th of 2020, and by April 4th, we were back up and operating virtually.

From April 4th, 2020, up through this -- this academic year, we've put on seventy five virtual shows.

So obviously, you know, it was a lot of figuring out as we were going, but I think that this team has become so adept at not only in-person presentations, which we all love to do, which is why we got into this business, but now we are wonderful producers of virtual programs, and now we're also going outdoor and having more outdoor events and public art events, and you're going to see that in our in the warmer months of the semester and next.

Zydalis Bauer: Speaking of the 75 virtual events that you all put on, like many of us, this was a new avenue for you to explore during the pandemic.

What were some of the successes that came out of those virtual events? And do you think it's something that will continue on beyond the pandemic?

Jamilla Deria: Well, I think that the great thing about virtual events is that they're actually a bit more affordable, which means that we have more money to invest in the artists and the development of new work. So for the first time in a very long time, we were able to really partner with artists and present a number of world premieres.

We also expanded how we present arts education programs. So for example, we partnered with the Jazz at Lincoln Center and Wynton Marsalis. The weeks leading up to the election, we invited them to teach a six part course on jazz as a tool of liberation, because there's something really kind of fantastic -- whether you're a jazz lover or not, there's something really fantastic about how jazz is created in real time.

I mean, a lot of jazz is improvization and it's improvization at a masterful level. So, you know, the players are not only so in-tune with the -- their own instrument and the sound that they're developing, but they're also in real time listening and co-creating with their ensemble mates.

And so the democratization of jazz and in that anyone can kind of have a moment to have their voice articulated, I think that that theme was something that we wanted to explore through this course, and as well as jazz has been activism music since its very beginning. And so it's not only speaking voice to the people, but it also -- in it's form, you know, expressing how democracy works.

And I think that that was an exciting new model for us, in terms of not only presenting exciting works, but really bringing you into these -- these masters workshops to really kind of hear their perspectives, hear their voices, look at how they approach the development of new work.

I was also excited about the Fine Arts Center was a part of a team of presenters across the nation to present and premiere a new opera by a composer named Daniel Bernard Roumain. It was to mark the 100th anniversary of the Tulsa Massacre.

And we were able to really give voice and space to this -- this wonderful composer to get his work out there. And we had a national conversation about sort of the state of race relations in America, and what we what we hope for and what we want to see in the years ahead.

Zydalis Bauer: Your emphasis has been re-engaging the live audience, getting people comfortable to be back in person.

What has the response been so far from the audience, as well as the local art scene?

Jamilla Deria: Everyone is, you know, really excited to gather again. Obviously, the Omicron and its emergence really slowed some momentum.

But before our holiday break, we saw -- we sold about 700 tickets to a wonderful family performance, and it was the energy in the room can't be replaced on the screen. And while I definitely love our virtual offerings, I think it gives you access and brings people from all over the world together and really special ways....you know, that collective "ahh," that collective breath that we take as as an artist reaches the pinnacle of their performance, that you know, you can't --you can't replace that.

And so for those who've come back -- and we've had quite a few come back -- I think they're just so thrilled to be together again.

Zydalis Bauer: Now, the saying is always "the show must go on." We hear that all the time.

Why is that exceptionally important during these challenging times that we're going through?

Jamilla Deria: You know what? Art not only helps us learn better, but it also helps us live better. I mean, we are -- we are meant to be together experiencing, you know, the highest expression of human creativity, ingenuity, wonder.

And I think that...I think that there's -- I think now more than ever, as we as a society kind of socially isolate, as we deal with such serious issues as a global pandemic, the reckoning of sort of race relations in the country, growing economic inequality, more than ever do we need to come together through the arts to help really create bridges -- because we've lost a lot of bridges in the last few years as we've polarized.

And I don't think of any better form than sort of a rich art experience to remind people that we are not, you know, digital enemies. We are neighbors. We are, we are community, we are friends, and -- and the arts are here for all of us.

Zydalis Bauer: Jamilla, as you know, artists, performers, and even venues like the UMass Fine Arts Center have all had to be creative and rethink how artistry is presented.

What are some of the prevailing trends that you are witnessing in response to local and national ordinances and put in place during the pandemic?

Jamilla Deria: Thank you for that question.

You know, I touched on the need for all arts organizations to become more versatile -- to not only be in-person presenters, but virtual presenters, and then also outdoor presenters. I think another sort of challenge that I think COVID really brought to the fore for all of us -- and we've been talking about this for decades now -- but I think Covid really brought us to sort of a reckoning point, is that we need to open our doors to more audiences.

We we certainly love the audiences that come now, those who have been with us from the very beginning. We're forty six-years-old as an organization. Some -- some of our -- some of the folks who came to our very first performance in October of 1975 are still around today, and they come back and we love them.

But, we also know that there are groups of people that we don't yet serve. And I think that for the future of the arts, not only in terms of the Fine Arts Center, but nationally, we need to be able to not only reflect a full range of cultures and communities on our stages, but we have to turn the camera and look at the audience to see if we are reflecting that in the house. And if we're not, then there's so much work that needs to be done, because our communities are here.

This is a very diverse area. But then if you go into some of our theaters, you don't -- it doesn't reflect that diversity. And we understand that our great lesson coming out of COVID is that that is no longer an issue that can be sidelined, that it needs to be our central work, that the Fine Arts Center and our building has been renamed after our very first African-American chancellor, Dr. Bromery, so the Bromery Center for the Arts.

We're here not only to present diverse arts, but for diverse audiences.

Last year, the UMass Amherst Fine Arts Center kicked off their Fall season with a variety of performances and programming including the reopening of the University’s art galleries after being closed due to the pandemic.  Zydalis Bauer speaks with Jamilla Deria, Director of the Fine Arts Center, to learn how the local arts scene is prevailing during the pandemic as well as to hear about the rest of the season’s upcoming events at the FAC. Explore

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Shire Breu-Hous Brews up Beer in Historic Dalton Building

June 30, 2022

In the town of Dalton, the building known as The Stationery Factory has a history that dates back to a time when industrial factories ruled the day and could be found up and down the Housatonic River.  With those days of industry now a thing of the past, the building currently houses over 20 individual businesses, including one that could be looked at as something of a modern-day assembly line.  Connecting Point's Brian Sullivan paid a visit to t

In the town of Dalton, the building known as The Stationery Factory has a history that dates back to a time when industrial factories ruled the day and could be found up and down the Housatonic River.  With those days of industry

In the town of Dalton, the building known as The Stationery Factory has a history that dates back to a time when industrial factories ruled the day and could be found up and down the Housatonic River.  With those days of industry now a thing of the past, the building currently houses over 20 individual businesses, including one that could be looked at as something of a modern-day assembly line.  Connecting Point's Brian Sullivan paid a visit to t

In the town of Dalton, the building known as The Stationery Factory has a history that dates back to a time when industrial factories ruled the day and could be found up and down the Housatonic River.  

With those days of industry now a thing of the past, the building currently houses over 20 individual businesses, including one that could be looked at as something of a modern-day assembly line.  

Connecting Point's Brian Sullivan paid a visit to the Shire Breu-Hous – a craft brewery, restaurant, and taproom located in the building – and brings us the story. 

Watch a feature on the workers of the Shire Breu-Hous.

This story originally aired on January 20, 2022.

Read the full transcript:

Tony Dunne, Connecting Point: In the Berkshire county town of Dalton, the building, known as the Stationery Factory, has a history that dates back to a time when industrial mills could be found up and down the Housatonic River and ruled the day.

Like so many other mill buildings, it's been repurposed now and houses over 20 individual businesses, including a craft brewery and restaurant that could be looked at as a modern day assembly line of a different kind.

Connecting Point's Brian Sullivan paid a visit to the Shire Breu-Hous and brings us the story.

Brian Sullivan, Connecting Point: The central Berkshires town of Dalton, Massachusetts, is a place that roughly 6,500 people call home. It's where one kid grew up to win a World Series, make the All-Stars for his hometown Boston Red Sox, and have a sports complex named after him.

Like many towns out this way, the Housatonic River lives here, too, carving through the landscape past old mill buildings like this one. It's also where the United States gets its currency paper from. And not too long ago, Crane and Co. had a stationery division here at 63 Flansburg Ave.

It may not be the paper factory it once was, but the building now houses over 20 businesses, some of them miniature factories in their own right. Here at the Shire Breu-Hous, there's a brew underway before the sun has made its first appearance of the day, and that's par for the course in the life of a beer maker.

Nick Whalen, Shire Breu-Hous: A typical brew day is eight to ten hours, all told, from start to finish. So, depending on how much cellar work we do afterwards, typically we'll mash in early in the morning around 6, 6:30.

And then we'll typically finish around one o'clock in the afternoon. And then we then we cleaned the brewhouse after that. And then there's other things that we might be doing during the day.

Brian Sullivan: Shire Breu-Hous is the brainchild of co-owners Nick Whalen and childhood friend Andrew Crane, who opened the doors to this 8,000-square-foot basement brewery restaurant in the summer of 2017.

The place certainly looks to be in tip top condition now. That's thanks in no small part to brew team member Mark Geibel, who was tasked with the carpentry work to make it look this way, before it became the brewhouse and before he was one of the brewers.

Mark Geibel, Shire Breu-Hous: The first time I saw this space, it was full of heavy equipment, industrial machinery, forklifts, old pumps, and it was basically a general storage area. So, my first tasks down here were to clean up the space to maybe attract a tenant such as ourselves now.

Brian Sullivan: The team here may be small, but it's a solid, hardworking unit and they seem to really enjoy what they do.

Mark Geibel: It's fun. We like to come to come to work. We know we have each other's backs and...it's fun to learn every day as well. We take taking everything we get from each other and other brewers.

And you know, it's it's a culinary and science experiment on a daily basis, and we have fun with it.

Brian Sullivan: It even looks like a giant science experiment. And they use language to describe what they're doing that's not often heard in the outside world. But the one part that an outsider like me can understand is, when they get rid of these spent grains.

This happens when most of the sugars, proteins and nutrients have been extracted from the malt during the mash. And the circle of life continues as the spent grains are then placed in these barrels and left upstairs for the local farmers to pick up and reuse.

Now, these guys might be done with this portion of the brewing process, but today is really considered day zero. Next up is the fermentation process, and that will probably take about two weeks before they can start putting it into barrels and cans. Luckily, they've got plenty of those barrels in stock, so they can have 12 on tap here at the bar.

But those taps wouldn't start pouring until at least 4:30 in the afternoon when the restaurant opens. Prior to Covid, the brew crew also ran the restaurant end of things. The closures of 2020 gave them some time to rethink how to operate both ends of the business.

Enter Berkshire Culinary Group and chef Matt Motter with a solution.

Matt Motter, Berkshire Culinary Group: Restaurants and breweries are both twenty four hour jobs. You can't really do both. It's just -- there's just not enough hours in a day, not enough personnel to be focused on one thing or the other.

The Shire Brue-Hous seemed like a good opportunity to come in and say, "Guys, let me be your chef so that you can concentrate on making amazing beer, and I'm going to use that beer to compliment the food and cook with it."

Brian Sullivan: Unlike other reclamation projects like this one, this operation isn't being run by some out-of-state absentee landlord investor. Everyone involved is from within a three town radius. Chef Motter's parents used to work in this building in the 1980s and 90s. Coming from Pittsfield, Nick Whalen is the proverbial local-boy-makes-good.

But to speak with him, it's almost as if he hasn't taken the time to realize what he's accomplished so far.

Nick Whalen: It's been go, go, go for five -- four or five years now, and then, you know, it's you don't really have a lot of time to reflect on it. We worked really hard to get to this point where we're still in business and making better beer than we've ever made.

So, I really just want people to have a nice beer and some nice food with a good company. And that's really it. It's very simple: good food, good drink, and good friends.

In the town of Dalton, the building known as The Stationery Factory has a history that dates back to a time when industrial factories ruled the day and could be found up and down the Housatonic River.  With those days of industry now a thing of the past, the building currently houses over 20 individual businesses, including one that could be looked at as something of a modern-day assembly line.  Connecting Point's Brian Sullivan paid a visit to t

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